Author Topic: Blog post: How much difference would it make driving a luxury car vs a cheaper c  (Read 303 times)

Patrick

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http://investorchallenge.co.za/how-much-difference-would-it-make-driving-a-luxury-car/

Hamster

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I tried a "Corolla" and no, never again. I'll take the hit on the more expensive car thank you very much  :TU:  :-[

Patrick

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I tried a "Corolla" and no, never again. I'll take the hit on the more expensive car thank you very much  :TU:  :-[
;D
I tried buying a cheap Audi, and when it worked it was heaven. Sadly there's no such thing as a cheap Audi. What I saved in purchase price I made up for in parts costs!

santoshlv426

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Nobody look's at the Empie State Building or Golden Gate bridge and thinks "I wonder how much that cost".
Similarly, when driving a nice, comfortable car for the experience, you don't think about the price and there's no justifying driving a Corolla, or almera when you can afford better and I've experienced that first hand. On a cold winter morning, seat warmers are a necessity, not a luxury.
I don't own a Porsche and doubt I ever will in this lifetime. I"ve made peace with that. I did test drive a Porsche Cayman though and the sound of those gear changes justify buying it, irrespective of cost.

It's an experience in itself and isn't that what life is moving to - Experiences, rather than possessions.
That said, I probably negated my own argument, as now that I've had the Experience of those gear changes, I don't need to actually own it.

gcr

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Last night late I tried to post but got an answer that the server was too busy and my post was distributed into to ether, so let me post my comments once again:-
This article is totally contrived and a nonsense as it doesn't deal with realities, humanistic urges (if you like), what it seems to try and convey is that if you save and deny yourself and your family some pleasures in life that at the end of the day you will be exceedingly well off at the end of the day. There is no costing around schooling yet our 2 examples seem to have kids, there is a presumption that they have similar paying jobs but nothing about number of kids, whether they employ domestics and gardeners.
The views taken are Cyclops in nature and have no relevance in life, in fact the article is so skewed that it misrepresents life totally.
The essence of the story is that one person enjoys life whilst the other beavers away every cent that they can and story line is about new car versus second cars and how long you keep the cars for. A secondhand car after 5 years out of its motor plan is going to cost and a motor car is a poor example, as technology is changing so fast that it makes a 10 year old car almost redundant. There is an issue around insurance as well, as, as insurance premiums drop so does the replacement value of the car making it more difficult to recover a reasonable payout in a collision, and its trade in value is negligible
In the one instance you have a person who enjoys cars (given the types of car bought) and probably also enjoys driving for driving's sake, the other will battle along with a second hand car with mounting costs of repairs and probably find that spares are not readily available.
I could go on and analyse the context, but that could be boring, suffice to say that the article is skewed to prove the authors point that it is advantageous to undertake some form of savings over ones working life. The reality is that if you are in a well paying job make sure you make some saving commitments, another reality is that maybe consider having your kids early in your marriage so that from age 45 onwards you have no schooling or varsity fees to deal with and your kids are out of the house. From age 45 onwards should be your highest earning segment until you retire - and more importantly when you retire you want to retire comfortably rather than a sour puss rich individual who is likely to die soon after retirement because they have no ambition or hobby to pursue.
Life is for living just keep a balance in your life
       
Not everything that counts, can be counted, and, not everything that can be counted counts - Albert Einstein

Patrick

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@gcr, of course the article was ridiculous, you'll never get two perfectly matched people, what the article was trying to say is that all other things being equal, someone who views cars as a transport tool will end up spending less money than someone who views cars as toys. The numbers are part of the usual I never knew it would cost that much shock factor. Most of my friends/colleagues are quite well off professionals, and I know someone who owns/has owned each one listed.
The reality is that if you are in a well paying job make sure you make some saving commitments, another reality is that maybe consider having your kids early in your marriage so that from age 45 onwards you have no schooling or varsity fees to deal with and your kids are out of the house.
That's a really interesting thought, and not one I've heard before. My dad had his last child well in his 50s and partly due to that is still needing to work when most people his age are winding down. I know there are serious health benefits to having children younger, so this is something people should consider.

On a cold winter morning, seat warmers are a necessity, not a luxury.
Absolutely, or maybe you should leave Alaska during the winter.  ;)

gcr

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@gcr, of course the article was ridiculous, you'll never get two perfectly matched people, what the article was trying to say is that all other things being equal, someone who views cars as a transport tool will end up spending less money than someone who views cars as toys. The numbers are part of the usual I never knew it would cost that much shock factor. Most of my friends/colleagues are quite well off professionals, and I know someone who owns/has owned each one listed.
The reality is that if you are in a well paying job make sure you make some saving commitments, another reality is that maybe consider having your kids early in your marriage so that from age 45 onwards you have no schooling or varsity fees to deal with and your kids are out of the house.
That's a really interesting thought, and not one I've heard before. My dad had his last child well in his 50s and partly due to that is still needing to work when most people his age are winding down. I know there are serious health benefits to having children younger, so this is something people should consider.

On a cold winter morning, seat warmers are a necessity, not a luxury.
Absolutely, or maybe you should leave Alaska during the winter.  ;)
Living in SA it is absolutely stupid to have seat warmers even when it gets "cold" in Joburg - 2/3 months of the year - come on
Not everything that counts, can be counted, and, not everything that can be counted counts - Albert Einstein

Hamster

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I have seat warmers in my car. I've forgotten about them until now :p

Came with the leather seats, but I can't imagine a situation where I'd ever pay extra for them.

santoshlv426

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Hamster, GCR,
I don't even live in JHB but the warmer northern regions of Centurion and I totally disagree, I use the seat warmers every day (in the mornings)
But the point's made though.
Remeber guys, you can't take it with you - at some point YOU WILL DIE and I for one, want that last cheque to bounce !


Who on this forum want's their hard earned capital to outlive them ?

Hamster

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Yeah, choke to death on my last penny :D

gcr

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I certainly don't want to choke on my last penny when I die. I was co - executor for both my parents and the costs for funeral arrangements, and estate winding up can be quite expensive. So be kind to your kids leave at least R 100,000 (in today's money)to them to manage you and your spouses departure from this environment, they don't deserve to pay your dues. Also if the main asset owner (read you) has these assets transferred to another (your spouse) all transfers are subject to CGT and possibly estate duty (can be deferred to surviving spouse) and other legal costs
As the saying goes their is death and SARS to contend with in life
Not everything that counts, can be counted, and, not everything that can be counted counts - Albert Einstein